Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier

Posted by: shazam24

Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 11:20 AM

Hello to all,

I would like to get advice from people that have done the coast to coast walk with a dog in tow. The walk will be the summer in aid of Help for Hero's. My wife and I are planning to camp some night and stay in B&B's Hostel on others. I have emailed the YHA and they have told me that only guide dogs are allowed. My question is has anyone done this walk in a similar way with a dog?
I am also interested to hear what people's opinions of getting your rucksacks dropped off at certain points is. A small part of me thinks that it kind of defeats the object. Another part of me thinks that it may make it more enjoyable.

thanks
Phil, Helen and Lucy the dog
Posted by: Harland

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 11:32 AM

Whilst I can't respond about your dog as far as carrying or not carrying all your belongings I think the answer is whatever will make you enjoy the walk more. There is nothing wrong with having it transported and some people couldn't do the walk without this service. I always carry mine as I enjoy the physical side of the walk as well as the scenery etc, however currently I am fit enough to do so. When I am not then I would certainly use a carrier service but to be honest, apart from when I am camping, there isn't much I would want transported only one change of clothing for the evening, spare underwear/socks and my washing gear. I would still need to carry waterproofs, first aid stuff, food, drink, extra clothing if too cold, survival bag, camera, phone, maps, compass etc.
Posted by: Janice & Rottie

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 01:35 PM

Hi,

I did the C2C with 2 dogs in tow and carried my own pack. However, I did send the dog's food on ahead as I stayed in B&B's and couldn't carry that aswell.

I didn't encounter any problems and both my dogs thoroughly enjoyed the walk. I was lucky because Keld YH allowed me to leave the dogs in the cycle barn. They made a lovely little bed with straw bales, and kept it locked, so they would be safe. I obviously had a key. There was no other accommodation open at the time as it was end of the season and I simply rang them and asked if they knew anywhere. The guy said there wasn't and the YHA rule was no dogs. However, rules can be broken and he said if I was happy with the barn for them, then they could stay. They had a very yummy breakfast of sausage and bacon leftovers.
We are talking many years ago though.

Make sure your dog is used to walking distances on a regular basis and you will enjoy.
Posted by: Janice & Rottie

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 01:38 PM

Oh, forgot to say that I agree with Harland. If you want to have your pack transported along the route, then I don't think there is any stigma against that. The usual idea is to enjoy the walk and to me that means not having to carry a big pack.

When I did it I didn't know about the services which are offered now.
Posted by: Oldun

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 03:59 PM

Just for info and not a joke.

On this years C2C I came across a guy whose dog was suffering from badly worn paws; quite red in places. He wanted to know where he could find dog shoes. The dog wanted to keep up with his owner, but was limping badly.

Guess if you have a town dog and take it on a multi day trek you need to know their capabilities as well.
Posted by: Morpeth_Exile

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 08:46 PM

When walking it in 2005 I kept bumping into and walking with a group with Bea the Beagle. They had a good list of Dog Friendly B&Bs so they do exist but they did struggle at times with having to take detours around fields to avoid livestock, although it was May and the lambing season.
Regarding the bag transporting, in my view it is brilliant. My back will only carry the day bag of bait, flask and emergency stuff and for a fiver a day it was good to know the rucksack, with clean clothes, was at the other end. When I was younger I may have had the urge to be fully self-sufficient (I can understand the view) but I now want to enjoy as much of the walking as possible. A woman at Keld Youth Hostel took it to a different level, however, with a huge suitcase and pink, fluffy slippers in order to "retain a feminine touch". Horses \ courses etc but whatever makes you enjoy a great walk the most
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 08:50 PM

A major problem this year on open moorland has been the number of dogs bitten by adders. The reaction of most people when warned about this is that you are either trying to deter them from walking with a dog, or, that it "won't happen to me".

The problem occurs most often on sunny days when the adders are warming themselves in the sunshine ... generally on bare patches within the heather. Dogs close to their owners are seldom bitten as the adders hear them approaching, but once allowed to roam freely in the heather the dogs inquisitiveness often is their downfall.

In relationship to the number of dogs on the moors (which is where incidences are generally confined to) the number bitten is tiny, but, whereas ten years ago it was only rarely heard of many vets are now making quite a healthy living out of it. Callout charges range from 200 upwards depending on the area.

Bites are not fatal on a healthy dog, it is more the inconvenience of dealing with the outcome that is irritating

It perhaps is something to be more aware of than afraid of and it certainly wouldn't stop me taking one out.
Posted by: Reluctanttrucker

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 17/12/09 11:03 PM

I thought adders were confined to the south,and I have only ever seen one,and that was due to a call of nature. It took one look at me and slept on.Nothing to prove,I suppose.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 18/12/09 12:00 PM

During the most recent major foot and mouth epidemic many of the upland areas were closed to the public throughout the major breeding season. This allowed birds and mammals to breed unaffected by human disturbance. The outcome was an explosion in survival rates amongst plovers, merlins, adders etc etc. This still has implications today, especially as regards adders which have been around this year in unprecedented numbers. Humans rarely see them as they hear us coming and slither away into the safety of the undergrowth. Dogs however (tend) to move a lot quicker and quieter and, hearing something in the undergrowth, move towards the sound much quicker than the adder can retreat. Finding the adder they do what dogs do and sniff it. The adder, sensing danger then strikes at the dogs face. This has been a record year for such occurrences. I carry the contact number of local vets when at work.
Posted by: RichardJ

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 18/12/09 01:35 PM

Originally Posted By: Reluctanttrucker
I thought adders were confined to the south,and I have only ever seen one,and that was due to a call of nature. It took one look at me and slept on.Nothing to prove,I suppose.


On my last crossing (in May) there was an adder lying slap bang in the middle of the path near Trough House on the NY Moors. It didn't bite my dog!

Also, again not joking, sore paws can be a problem and you can buy "paw wax" to rub on the pads.
Posted by: Janice & Rottie

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 18/12/09 01:59 PM

You can get adders up here in South Cumbria too. I was also aware of them in Northumberland.
Posted by: Slogger

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 18/12/09 06:53 PM

Originally Posted By: Oldun
Just for info and not a joke.

On this years C2C I came across a guy whose dog was suffering from badly worn paws; quite red in places.


Not on the C2C but whilst doing the Offa's Dyke Path. We met aguy on the second day and ended up walking most of the rest of theway with him and his Border Collie. When we met up with him in the morning near Trevor his dog was limping badly from a perforated pad. He bandaged it best he could but the dog was only using one of its hind legs. After several miles it sat down exhausted and refused to budge. He left us and headed off to Llangollen to find a vet. He caught up with us a couple of days later, his dog now fully recovered after an antibiotic shot and painkillers. maybe adding a few doggy items to your first aid kit would be agood idea?
Dave.
Posted by: Janice & Rottie

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 21/12/09 01:38 PM

Agreed with the First Aid Kit suggestion. I always take a doggy boot as well. The main thing though is to ensure that your dog is really used to the type of walking you are requiring it to do. I have been on may LDPs with my dogs and have never had any problems, but then we trained for them together. They have also done the Lyke Wake walk with me too. I felt shattered at the end, especially after sitting down waiting for my B&B lift, whereas my dogs were still keen to go.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: Coast to Coast with a Lakeland Terrier - 21/12/09 03:44 PM

Just a thought. If you did the walk with a team of huskies, so when you got tired they could pull you ..... would that count?