April Walking

Posted by: al-bag

April Walking - 23/03/11 12:11 PM

Good morning all,

I'm walking from south to north in a few week's time, so after reading all the words of wisdom on here and picking up lots of useful tips, I have registered and have a couple of questions.

I'll be camping, mostly in campsites (so I can make use of showers, shops and public houses) but on occasion the way I'm breaking up the trip doesn't coincide with campsites so I will need to find myself a secluded spot. Pitching late and levaing early of course. I'll be sleeping under an ex-army poncho/tarp with a couple of walking poles so need a little more shelter that necessary for a normal tent. I'm after somewhere for the second night (between Crowden and Colden) and have seen people talking about a quarry which I can't see on the map. Any ideas?

Also the penultimate night (between Bellingham and Byrness, somewhere around Gibshiel Woods. It looks to me as though there is plenty of scope to find somewhere amongst the plantation, but I've some seen comments about it being a reeking bog which doesn't sound appealing. Bearing in mind it will be late April, do you think there will be somewhere sheltered and dry in that area, or thereabouts?

The last night I plan to use the hut near Lamb Hill (the last leg in one go is beyond me) and will get there good and early to secure a spot as it will be the night before the Royal wedding/May Day bank holiday weekend. If the hut is full there will be time enough to go on to Davidson Linn, or find somewhere nearby.

If you have any advice it would be much appreciated. I'm leaving Edale on 14th April, and taking 16 days over it - if you're about then we may bump into each other - I'll be the chap with a spring in my step and a sunny disposition as the rain pours down....

Many thanks, pip pip
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: April Walking - 23/03/11 06:31 PM

A Hello and welcome to the forum

A lot depends on where you intend to camp the night before the Bellingham to Byrness section.

If you are overnighting well before Bellingham and wish to break your journey before Byrness there is ample scope for a wild camp en-route. There is a sheltered hollow after Padon Hill by a wall just as the trees start. Assuming it hasn't been unfavourably wet than it is easy enough to find a dry spot. Failing that, there are a few equally as favourable spots a little further on.

The traditional, though by no means only, camping spot on the long drag is by Davidsons Linn. Ample shelter and water, assuming it hasn't been unfavourably dry! Most other sites on the actual line can be a bit exposed in windy weather although fine otherwise.

If you are camping at Byrness (Caravanning and Camping club site there ... very cheap for solo backpackers with good showers and loos). Then consider spending the following night at Forest View in Byrness run by Joyce, one of the posters on this site. very walker friendly, will dry your socks and set you up for the next two days. Don't know the cost though!

The huts can fill up quickly in peak periods but in April there should be no bother.

Enjoy your walk, it really is a great experience!
Posted by: Slogger

Re: April Walking - 23/03/11 08:30 PM

Between Crowden and Colden is approximately 33 - 34 miles. If you were looking for somewhere about halfway, that would put you round about the M62 footbridge. It might be a bit breezy on that, and a bit hard for the pegs.
Another mile and ahalf further on as you drop of Blackstone edge, you may be able to find a suitable spot, however its all high ground around there, all the way to Stoodley Pike.
Theres a great spot that I used at Standedge, only a few hundred yards once across A62. Over the first stile as you literaly turn right off the track, a little piece of flat ground below a small rock wall. It is only about 12 miles further on than Crowden though, so may not be far enough for you.
Dave.
Posted by: Les + Heidi

Re: April Walking - 24/03/11 02:24 PM

I know the quarry your referring too. Its just before the A58 crossing where you'll find the White Horse Inn. Just before you turn down to the A58 you go ahead into the quarry, its flat and sheltered pretty well hidden and only a hundred yards from the pub, usual wild pitch approach would work there.

There are a fair few places to pitch on that last day too; much will depend on wind strength and direction. The huts you mention, there are also several land slips on the right as you climb up to windy gyle, aslo a flat area further along at Clennel street. I pictched on a tiny piece of grass just onto the patch leading upto the cheviot summit.

You'll have a ball on the PW, its a great walk.
Les
Posted by: tim smith

Re: April Walking - 24/03/11 05:17 PM

Yes we camped there 1974
I still remember the ground being very hard.
Posted by: tonyk

Re: April Walking - 24/03/11 06:46 PM

Slogger wrote
Quote:
Theres a great spot that I used at Standedge, only a few hundred yards once across A62. Over the first stile as you literaly turn right off the track, a little piece of flat ground below a small rock wall. It is only about 12 miles further on than Crowden though, so may not be far enough for you.


I used that spot last time I walked the PW.It was the only bit of level grass I could find.If you are going on to Whitehouse its a fair walk and might be a bit too much after the slog over Black Hill.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: April Walking - 24/03/11 11:57 PM

April is pretty much peak period. Late April through to early july is probably the most popular time and this year seems busier than usual. Our theory is that a large proportion of walkers walk the Pennine way the year after they walk the coast to coast (yes I know it`s a generalisation but it`s suprising how often I hear it) well last year the coast to coast was absolutely heaving due to the Bradbury effect. So we think that the increase in Pennine wayers is the knock on to the Bradbury effect. Does this make sense or am I rambling again.Anyway enjoy your walk and if you need supplies call in. Joyce
Posted by: Stottie

Re: April Walking - 25/03/11 06:25 AM

Originally Posted By: tonyk
Slogger wrote
Quote:
Theres a great spot that I used at Standedge, only a few hundred yards once across A62. Over the first stile as you literaly turn right off the track, a little piece of flat ground below a small rock wall. It is only about 12 miles further on than Crowden though, so may not be far enough for you.


I used that spot last time I walked the PW.It was the only bit of level grass I could find.If you are going on to Whitehouse its a fair walk and might be a bit too much after the slog over Black Hill.



A couple of years ago I camped just east of Standedge at the Carriage House pub - decent beer and food, showers etc available, 5 per night. Only problem was traffic noise, but the earplugs helped.
Posted by: al-bag

Re: April Walking - 25/03/11 06:56 PM

Thanks everyone, that's extremely helpful. I suspect I'll aim for the White Horse and the quarry on day 2, with a back-up plan of eating at the Carriage House and walking on a few miles (or having a few more pints) if I don't feel up to that distance. I should be OK for a bit of a slog though - day 1 will be easy enough with a day pack and a proper bed for the night as my sister lives nearby...

My last few days look like this -

Greenhead to Stonehaugh - 16 miles
Stonehaugh to Padon Hill - 17 miles
Padon Hill to Lamb Hill - 17 miles
Lamb Hill to Kirk Yetholm - 19 miles

I didn't want to take five days over this section, so to split it into four without a very long first or last day, Bellingham and Byrness don't really work for stops. I will be popping in for supplies of course. It's good to know though that there are places to stop in the Padon Hill area. I'm about to book train tickets, so no backing out now!

Thanks for all the advice, I'm sure I'll be asking for more at some stage.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: April Walking - 25/03/11 08:26 PM

Is it the White Horse or the White House?
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: April Walking - 25/03/11 08:28 PM

When booking train tickets try splitting the journey into stages, You can often save quite a lot of cash by buying tickets in two, three or four sections rather than a complete single journey.