pennine way in two visits

Posted by: frank

pennine way in two visits - 25/09/09 04:31 PM

hello done the c2c, whw, offas dyke, next the pennine way but due to time restrictions, will have to do it in two visits, first half in spring and 2nd half later on, but I keep thinking this is like cheating, not doing the walk in one go, what do you think?
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 25/09/09 04:37 PM

Yes, it is cheating, not a proper challenge, and you might live to regret it, but if time restrictions give you no alternative then that must be better than staying at home with your feet up in front of the TV.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 25/09/09 04:48 PM

Far rather do it in 2 goes and enjoy it rather than rushing it making yourself ill and not seeing anything on the way up.
Posted by: plodder

Re: pennine way in two visits - 25/09/09 08:07 PM

Frank,
It's not cheating.Do what you want to do when you want to or can do it.For some people walking anywhere or even standing up is a challenge. You have nothing to prove. How dare some say its cheating. Don,t even ask the question.
Posted by: Stottie

Re: pennine way in two visits - 25/09/09 08:17 PM

starting in 1963, I've done it in single visits (each way) and I've done it in three visits in successive years.
Each time has provided a unique and enjoyable experience. All were satisfying, because in each case I did what I set out to do.
Once I failed. That was a big disappointment, because I was over halfway when I suffered an injury.
I've come across more people doing it in bits than end-to-end. Loads of people use a little bit of the PW as part of a circular day-walk.
Split it how you like: maybe walk north to Tan Hill one year and south to Tan Hill the next; perhaps start at Tan Hill each time.
Make it your trip, and be proud of it.
Cheating? Who gives a damn?
Posted by: flatlands

Re: pennine way in two visits - 26/09/09 02:19 PM

I'm thinking of doing the Pennine Way next year, but like you say frank. It's a lot in a fortnight to do, so I'll probably do in 2 parts.

No, I don't think it's cheating. people have done the Pennine Way in bits over a period of time, the main object is to enjoy the walk.
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 26/09/09 10:19 PM

You do it which way anyway you can. In one go, in two halves or in bits. Of course each way will have its own different experience, and the pure way is in one. If you cant do it in one you will have to settle for the differing experience. You cant have the same experience that those who do it one will have unless you do the same, but is it cheating, No, just different.
Dave.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 27/09/09 04:55 AM

Originally Posted By: plodder
Frank,
It's not cheating.Do what you want to do when you want to or can do it.For some people walking anywhere or even standing up is a challenge. You have nothing to prove. How dare some say its cheating. Don,t even ask the question.

'Cheating' is perhaps a somewhat harsh word for Frank to suggest, but I found it more satisfying walking the Offas Dyke path in one go than the Coast to Coast in three. The travelling backwards and forwards certainly does detract from it.
Posted by: frank

Re: pennine way in two visits - 27/09/09 04:58 PM

many thanks for your replies, you may be correct lounge lizzard, cheating maybe was the wrong word to use, but I think you all know what I mean, completing a LDW in two or more visits is the sense of achievement still the same? I am not sure.
I have completed many LDW here and in the himalayas all in one go, you know its not easy, but the challenge is there.
we have all seen people who route march the LDW, hell bent on getting from A to B as fast as possible, missing so much,why?
for some walkers it appears to be an ego thing or a race
I will walk the pennine way next year in two visits, enjoy it, I am 65 now, and hope when I complete the pennine way and pin my souvenier in my scrapbook, and in years to come look back and still be proud I did the pennine way, even if it was not in one go.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 27/09/09 07:07 PM

"we have all seen people who route march the LDW, hell bent on getting from A to B as fast as possible, missing so much,why?"
Some of us only have four weeks holidays a year, and other interests too, so no time to hang about.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 28/09/09 07:12 PM

What has given you the idea that anything but walking the PW in one stretch is "cheating?". There are no rules to doing the way other than perhaps, you start at Edale and finish at Kirk Yetholme having walked between the two points. From my experience the vast majority of walkers break it down into smaller sections, often over three separate weeks or 2x10 day sections. I feel that I have walked it just as much as the single stretch walker, especially as in many of the sections I had to retrace my steps, either to the car or back to public transport.

Do it at your own pace and enjoy the experience.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 28/09/09 09:28 PM

"you start at Edale and finish at Kirk Yetholme"
- and it could of course be argued that it's equally acceptable to start at Kirk Yetholme and finish at Edale, unless you know of a rule that says otherwise.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 28/09/09 10:06 PM

I apologise for this grave oversight. I shall slink into a corner and admonish myself .... or better ... I shall seek out any existing double ......
Posted by: Janice & Rottie

Re: pennine way in two visits - 29/09/09 02:03 PM

I think a lot depends on what you want from the walk. If you want a walking holiday with a big challenge then doing it in one go will meet that expectation. If you simply want a walking holiday then it doesn't matter how long you take to do it...you will still have done the PW. Whether you walk one day or a week, you can also still end up with a challange on your hands depending on the conditions.

I have done it once, many years ago, in one go (12-13 days)before all the paving was put down. Then again completing it last year when I simply walked every other weekend throughout the summer. I enjoyed them both.
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 30/09/09 01:09 PM

Why do people who walk slower than others, come to the conclusion that the faster walker is missing so much. Thats untrue, I walk fast and take everything in. The only things I am missing is the extra and longer nights spent in the pub at the end of a shorter walking day, carrying the extra weight due to the longer time walking the route, and the extra cost.
Walk faster, further and cheaper, then maybe you can do it in one.
Dave.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 30/09/09 04:35 PM

It is a generalisation but when chatting to Pennine wayers the ones who are doing it in 17+ days talk more about seeing interesting birds, reptiles,land formations etc. could be that they are seeing more or maybe the slower walkers walk less often so seeing an eagle or an adder is more of a novelty for them so they are still buzzing when they get to us.While the walkers `doing it in 12 days or thereabouts just want to eat and get to bed. Both valid both enjoying it in their own way.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 30/09/09 04:38 PM

The Countryside Commission undertake a biannual survey of national trail users. This involves interviewers standing at hotspots along each trail and surveying everyone that passes, regardless of whether they are doing the full trail or not. This means that dog walkers, picnickers, solitude seeking romantic couples etc are included as well as people doing the whole trail either in one go or as part of a series of walks. Experience as part of this survey shows that people walking at different speeds see different things. To take the PW as merely an example, slower walkers tend to visit "off site" attractions, especially at the end of the day. (Faster walkers tend to establish a base at the end of the day and remain there be it a camp or pub). This is in no way intended as a criticism of either group, but both do it their own way and should get their enjoyment as they see fit. There is no right or wrong way to undertake any walk.
I remember one (faster) walker telling me that he "could spare me a couple of minutes" to answer the questions. He actually told me that he "stopped looking at the views many years ago". On the other hand a slow pair replied "what waterfall" when standing alongside High Force!!!!
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 30/09/09 08:19 PM

Originally Posted By: slowcoach
The Countryside Commission undertake a biannual survey of national trail users. This involves interviewers standing at hotspots along each trail and surveying everyone that passes, regardless of whether they are doing the full trail or not. This means that dog walkers, picnickers, solitude seeking romantic couples etc are included as well as people doing the whole trail either in one go or as part of a series of walks. Experience as part of this survey shows that people walking at different speeds see different things. To take the PW as merely an example, slower walkers tend to visit "off site" attractions, especially at the end of the day. (Faster walkers tend to establish a base at the end of the day and remain there be it a camp or pub). This is in no way intended as a criticism of either group, but both do it their own way and should get their enjoyment as they see fit. There is no right or wrong way to undertake any walk.
I remember one (faster) walker telling me that he "could spare me a couple of minutes" to answer the questions. He actually told me that he "stopped looking at the views many years ago". On the other hand a slow pair replied "what waterfall" when standing alongside High Force!!!!

Some very valid comments that were well worth slinking out of the corner to make !
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 30/09/09 09:21 PM

............ but I have now returned to continue my penance.....
Posted by: RedDevil

Re: pennine way in two visits - 01/10/09 02:25 PM

well in my opionion, the pennine way is a 268 mile walk... if you do it in 2 visits, you doing 2 smaller walks.

if you run 13 miles this year, then 13 miles next year... you wouldnt tell people you did a 26 mile marathon would ya lol

mind you, i also think people who B&B it are cheats so ignore me smile

however you do it, just do it at a comfortable pace and enjoy it smile
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 01/10/09 05:11 PM

Ah .... a slight difference here because a marathon is a particular race run under a set of specific rules. By definition a marathon is a 26 mile run (Sorry Lounge Lizard .... 26 mile 385 yard run) ... so two thirteen mile runs could not be called a marathon, even if one of the two sections was 13 miles 385 yards. However, the National Trails are not governed by any such regulations. So, if you decided, due to the weather, to walk up the Dun Fell access road rather than via Knock Fell you have still completed the Pennine Way.


I was one of the original founders of the Wolds Way (my picture is in Dave Rubenstein's book, so avoid this at all costs). There was never any thought during its formulation of a time schedule and the CC (or whatever it was called then) refused to define any target time for covering it.

Go for it at your own pace ... above all, enjoy the experience!
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 01/10/09 09:09 PM

Valid pionts accepted, however I have done many LDPs at the NORMAL pace when when walking with others, and the only side shows etc visited was the pub for the evening meal and drink and that seemed to go for others on the routes too.
As for birds and wildlife, I do see them, and I do take note as I have a particuler interest in them.
The other way to look at it, maybe I am actually seeing more in a day as I am covering twice the distance. Also by being on the move for 5am, chances are I see more as the nocturnals are still about and as for the sunrise, no I am not missing anything at all.
Dave.
Posted by: RedDevil

Re: pennine way in two visits - 02/10/09 02:59 PM

Good point Slogger.. i love the wildlife too, i read alot of walk diaries where they set off between 9-10am... such a shame, they must miss loads.

for this reason camping is much better for me, up with the sunrise... quick porridge breakfast and off smile
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 02/10/09 04:02 PM

RedDevil,
Absolutely, the only way to go in my opinion.
Not knocking anyone who prefers who do different, but please dont jump to assumptions about something that you know little or nothing about.
Dave.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 02/10/09 08:46 PM

Very true, best time of the day. I remember a few years back leaving Cockermouth about 4 or 5am, at Whitehaven in time for breakfast, then back in the midlands for lunch.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 02/10/09 08:51 PM

Originally Posted By: sea shore sam
Sounds like everyone on here is having a great time, lucky for you all.

So are you not having much luck at present ?
Posted by: beefy

Re: pennine way in two visits - 02/10/09 11:56 PM

Fast or slow, camping or not, isn't it down to your own personal agenda and not any unwritten rules?
I met a couple in their late 50's in the Stag at Dufton who had covered every mile there and back most weekends this year and were hoping to complete before the end of the year. There and back meaning park the car walk the route and then turn around and walk back to the car. When they get to Scotland they are gonna meet friends and family and celebrate. They will have completed the Pennine Way twice in one year, both ways. Hats off to em I say!
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 03/10/09 09:00 AM

I suppose it could be argued that doing it, as I did over 9 walking days, was in fact 9 walks as opposed to doing it in one. There you go then, next time, in ONE, a non-stopper!!!??
Dave.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 04/10/09 08:24 AM

Originally Posted By: slowcoach
Ah .... a slight difference here because a marathon is a particular race run under a set of specific rules. By definition a marathon is a 26 mile run (Sorry Lounge Lizard .... 26 mile 385 yard run) ... so two thirteen mile runs could not be called a marathon, even if one of the two sections was 13 miles 385 yards. However, the National Trails are not governed by any such regulations. So, if you decided, due to the weather, to walk up the Dun Fell access road rather than via Knock Fell you have still completed the Pennine Way.


I was one of the original founders of the Wolds Way (my picture is in Dave Rubenstein's book, so avoid this at all costs). There was never any thought during its formulation of a time schedule and the CC (or whatever it was called then) refused to define any target time for covering it.

Go for it at your own pace ... above all, enjoy the experience!

The standard distance for the marathon race was set by the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF) in May 1921 at a distance of 42.195 kilometres (26 miles 385 yards). Rule 240 of their Competition Rules specifies the metric version of this distance.
Slowcoach. I can't get used to this metric nonsence so 26 miles 385 yards is near enough for me.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 04/10/09 08:43 AM

Originally Posted By: beefy
Fast or slow, camping or not, isn't it down to your own personal agenda and not any unwritten rules?
I met a couple in their late 50's in the Stag at Dufton who had covered every mile there and back most weekends this year and were hoping to complete before the end of the year. There and back meaning park the car walk the route and then turn around and walk back to the car. When they get to Scotland they are gonna meet friends and family and celebrate. They will have completed the Pennine Way twice in one year, both ways. Hats off to em I say!

All that motoring backwards and forwards for just short distances walked would negate the relaxation and pleasure of the walk for me but if that's their way of doing the walk so be it.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 04/10/09 08:00 PM

Must have been a nightmare in the Cheviots. I did look at doing this but found the logistics impossible given accessibility by non 4x4 vehicles is strictly limited.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 05/10/09 04:10 PM

Originally Posted By: slowcoach
Must have been a nightmare in the Cheviots. I did look at doing this but found the logistics impossible given accessibility by non 4x4 vehicles is strictly limited.

.. and accessibility by 4x4 vehicles should be strictly limited too.
Posted by: RedDevil

Re: pennine way in two visits - 09/10/09 07:38 PM

Yea should be, but i noticed alot of Quad bike tracks all over the Way... mosty by farmers i know, but they are chewing up the route quite badly
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 10/10/09 09:49 AM

Originally Posted By: RedDevil
Yea should be, but i noticed alot of Quad bike tracks all over the Way... mosty by farmers i know, but they are chewing up the route quite badly

Yes, we never had this problem when farmers just had a horse and cart before all these government subsidies enabled them to buy all the latest four wheeled gadgetry.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 10/10/09 11:09 AM

A horse and cart would be very interesting on the gradients at Usswayford and other farms in the Cheviots.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 10/10/09 11:54 AM

Originally Posted By: joyce taylor
A horse and cart would be very interesting on the gradients at Usswayford and other farms in the Cheviots.

Very true, but farmers managed well enough for centuries up there without quad bikes, so they don't really need them now.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 10/10/09 04:16 PM

Animal husbandry has changed over the centuries and while previously a small flock provided an income this is no longer the case and to expect a farmer to keep a watch on a modern sized flock in very difficuilt terrain on foot is unrealistic (and not good for the sheep as they are quite silly animals and often get themselves into scrapes)
Posted by: RedDevil

Re: pennine way in two visits - 11/10/09 11:25 AM

Originally Posted By: joyce taylor
they are quite silly animals and often get themselves into scrapes)


Speaking of sheep, does anyone know if there eyesight is bad?

reason i ask is because when im walking they seem to see or hear you... stand there looking in your direction, then suddenly seem shocked when you get within 20 feet?

its like they can hear you first, then when they see you.... OMG its a Human.... run for your lives!!!
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 11/10/09 02:30 PM

But they can sense a cheese buttie at 50m!
Posted by: tim smith

Re: pennine way in two visits - 11/10/09 07:49 PM

i wonder how many of you have seen the ruts caused by a horse and cart
Posted by: tim smith

Re: pennine way in two visits - 11/10/09 07:51 PM

or heard the expression naff deep , but then again the word naff does not mean the same to-day
Posted by: tim smith

Re: pennine way in two visits - 11/10/09 08:00 PM

Naff
it was slang name for the hub of a cart wheel
[maybe Yorkshire slang]
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 08:46 AM

Originally Posted By: tim smith
i wonder how many of you have seen the ruts caused by a horse and cart

Yes, but only when the cart has been overloaded or there's been heavier than usual rainfall.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 08:52 AM

Originally Posted By: tim smith
Naff
it was slang name for the hub of a cart wheel
[maybe Yorkshire slang]

Well, that's in Yorkshire, but elsewhere a dictionary has it down as ;

Naff
British slang, today meaning uncool, tacky, unfashionable, worthless... or as a softer expletive, in places where one might use "f=ck" as in "naff off", "naff all", "naffing about".

Origins of the word are disputed, but it appears to have come from Polari (gay slang), used to dismissively refer to heterosexual people. It was introduced as a less offensive expletive verb ("naff off") in the '70s UK television show, Porridge. "Naff off!" was famously used by Princess Anne in 1982.

Naff
something uncool.

original meaning: "not available for f=cking"
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 10:29 AM

naff .... slang for a hub or cart wheel.... not in the Broad Acres I'm afraid.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 10:47 AM

Heavier than usual rainfall. Hmmm let me think....yepp that about sums up the bulk of the last 3 years. Short of a helicopter I don`t think it would have made a jot of difference which transport the farmers used the result would have been the same. (except maybe a boat)
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 02:15 PM

Originally Posted By: joyce taylor
Heavier than usual rainfall. Hmmm let me think....yepp that about sums up the bulk of the last 3 years. Short of a helicopter I don`t think it would have made a jot of difference which transport the farmers used the result would have been the same. (except maybe a boat)

As a townie I'm not best placed to comment on such matters ( not that that usually stops me though ) but as you say "Animal husbandry has changed over the centuries and while previously a small flock provided an income this is no longer the case and to expect a farmer to keep a watch on a modern sized flock in very difficuilt terrain on foot is unrealistic (and not good for the sheep as they are quite silly animals and often get themselves into scrapes)". I blame supermarkets driving down margins for farmers and making them take on such large flocks.
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 04:04 PM

Up here it is not so much large flock as large area because the soil in mountains and hills is shallow and often poor the sheep need a greater expanse to graze on.
Posted by: Lounge Lizard

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 05:02 PM

Originally Posted By: joyce taylor
Up here it is not so much large flock as large area because the soil in mountains and hills is shallow and often poor the sheep need a greater expanse to graze on.

Very well explained. Thanks.
I often think, well not that often, what a valuable contribution sheep make to the British diet and how fortunate it is that most of us are carnivores, or omnivores, as those vast upland areas are practically useless for the cultivation of vegetarian foodstuffs.
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 09:46 PM

On the high Cumbrian hills, you wont get a vehicle up there no matter how many wheels its got. I always find it fascinating, when the Shepherds are gathering their sheep in. It takes quite a number of them spread out over a large area with many sheep dogs working in teams to drive different flocks to the desired destination.
Dave.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 12/10/09 09:48 PM

Unless you're called Joss Naylor who rounds up every sheep in Cumbria, every day












Before breakfast
Posted by: joyce taylor

Re: pennine way in two visits - 13/10/09 09:48 AM

There is a flock of feral goats also grazing in the Cheviots near Uswayford farm. A fella staying here earlier in the year told me that ussi or something like it is swiss for goat.
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 13/10/09 07:38 PM

Slowcoach,
Not any more he doesnt, he retired a few years ago and moved from the farm in Wasdales Bowderdale to his retirement cottage, not too far away in Greendale, near the bridge.
Myself and a pal attempted his Joss Naylor Lakeland Challenge shortly before he moved and whilst he was renovating it. 48 miles over 28 mountain summits with 19,000ft of ascent, to be completed within 12 hours. We failed miserably but got to 33 miles within 8 hours and 16 summits, before the tendons started screaming, and received a really nice letter off him, urging us to try again another day. (Decision pending!)
Dave.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 13/10/09 08:51 PM

A couple of weeks ago I stayed for two nights at Wasdale Youth Hostel. On the second day I parked in the parking area to east of Greendale. I then walked up Seatallan, across to Haycock and on to Caw Fell. Whilst on Caw Fell I met a ranger who suggested that I could return by a different route .... down Blengdale (which I admit I had never heard of until then). I dropped down by Hanging Stone and picked up the blind bridleway. Just before the sheepfold I met the local shepherd driving his sheep in the opposite direction. During our conversation he mentioned that Joss still frequently helps him out ... his speciality evidently is searching for lost sheep. He tells Joss where he thinks they might be .... and off he goes! People like that never actually fully retire!!!!
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 16/10/09 07:23 PM

Yeah, you are right, its in thier blood. When he did his 60 at 60 (Lakeland Summits) to celebrate his 60th birthday. He came down to the finish after something like 120 miles and 45,000ft of ascent and descent. He was interviewed for the video being made and asked a question, it went like this.
"Joss, when you had descended Red Screes, you were in real trouble with that pain in your hips and you were leaning to one side. Everyone would have understood if you had stopped then, did it cross your mind?"
The look on Joss's face said it all, "You dont stop on these things, not when its in the heart" was his soft but simple reply.
A true Fell Running legend.
Dave.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 16/10/09 08:55 PM

Did I read somewhere that he had had problems with one or both of his knees which required a fairly serious operation? If true, he is all the more remarkable!
Posted by: Slogger

Re: pennine way in two visits - 17/10/09 02:38 PM

I dont know about that, but during the week before his 60 @ 60, whilst fixing a big heavy gate it toppled and fell on top of him. Hence the hip trouble. He knew he should have posponed his attempt, but felt he couldnt let down all the pacers and helpers that committed to that weekend for him.
Dave.
Posted by: beefy

Re: pennine way in two visits - 18/10/09 12:17 AM

Originally Posted By: RedDevil
Originally Posted By: joyce taylor
they are quite silly animals and often get themselves into scrapes)


Speaking of sheep, does anyone know if there eyesight is bad?

reason i ask is because when im walking they seem to see or hear you... stand there looking in your direction, then suddenly seem shocked when you get within 20 feet?

its like they can hear you first, then when they see you.... OMG its a Human.... run for your lives!!!


So funny that Red Devil! Something that puzzled me too. Also why do they all charge down the path in front to avoid you getting larger in numbers by the minute when all they have to do is turn left or right and not head in the direction you are walking?
I witnessed a farmer rounding up his sheep in the Cheviots on his quad bike, his dogs worked hundreds of yards from where he was covering a vast area. Within 15 minutes they had covered this huge area and all the sheep were under control. He needed a quad bike to keep up with how efficient the dogs were. Great to watch for an urban lad like myself.
Posted by: bogstomper

Re: pennine way in two visits - 19/10/09 06:27 PM

Talking about quad bikes, I saw a FOX HUNT between Bellingham and Byrness last month. One guy was tooting his bugle, dressed in red on horseback, while his compatriates were on quad bikes, with at least 30 hounds pursuing the fox!
Pick up trucks were on the surrounding roads, probably look-outs for the old Bill. I thought it was all illegal, but I saw an elderly couple, who informed me it was Sir Michael and it was his land & he could do whatever he wanted to do on it cool
Posted by: tim smith

Re: pennine way in two visits - 20/10/09 04:33 PM

Originally Posted By: tim smith
or heard the expression naff deep , but then again the word naff does not mean the same to-day




think i have got it sorted
Nave ,A.S.nafu,Dutch ,naaf.g.nabs.iceland, nof.
the central block of wheel in which the axle and spokes are inserted, the hub.
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 20/10/09 08:03 PM

So, all we need now is, in next weeks pub quiz, ...........
Posted by: slowcoach

Re: pennine way in two visits - 25/10/09 07:25 PM

Oh Dear .... another apology is due.

Last night, whilst reading "The Yorkshire Dictionary of Dialect, Tradition and Folklore" by Arnold Kellett (essential bedtime reading for insomniacs) I stumbled across this entry on page 121 ..... Naff .... hub or nave of a wheel (Old English Nafa)


Problem solved?