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#44411 - 06/01/09 07:48 PM Re: Planning [Re: Stottie]
Bliss 60 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 02/05/07
Posts: 273
Loc: Birmingham
Originally Posted By: Stottie
Fitness, and confidence in your kit and navigation, are essential. Almost as important is the ability of your group to function well.

I agree entirely with this, but the key issue I would suggest is having some idea of what you are capable of before you start is a good idea. If this is your first long distance walk, I'd make the following points:

1 if you haven't done long distance walking with a full pack before, it's a lot different from walking with a day pack. If you're not used to walking with a full pack and this is your first LDW, then you might want to think of using Sherpa's luggage carrying service. (NB. when I did the C2C, I met a guy who hadn't done any long distance walking before, started out carrying all his gear - knackered his knee - ended up having to get Sherpa to carry his stuff anyway (which I think they charge more for if its short notice) which also meant that he had to buy an additional day pack)

2 I put a thread on here a while back about the fourth day syndrome of long distance walking. Not sure if this is just me - but whenever I do long distance walking I find that - regardless of preparation - somewhere about the third or fourth day, I hit a wall and feel totally knackered. But if I walk through this and get through to the end of the day - by the next morning I'm feeling great and acclimatised to getting up and walking every day. I'm sure its different for different people, but you might find that you feel awful around about day 3 - but you should persevere because things will get better from then on.

I think your itinerary looks round about right for your first stab at an LDW - its more or less what I did - except that you are planning Richmond to Ingleby in one day. I split that at Danby Wiske - but regretted it because the Vale of Mowbray was not to my taste and I'd have preferred to have been over it one day - which is perfectly possible to do - starting out early and plodding relentlessly.

There are various options on the C2C you might want to consider, but if you're not confident and you want to find your feet so to speak - probably heading off up Haystacks on day two would be unwise. If the weather is good, I'd recommend coming over Helm Crag on dat three because its not that arduous and a much better route than down in the valley. On day four, you'll be able to decide once you get to Grisedale Tarn whether you want to tackle Hellvelyn or Friday Crag - rather than heading straight down to Patterdale - because both paths are clearly visible from the Tarn.

Moving on to Keld, if you feel like climbing at that point, I would strongly recommend going up Swinner Gill because the old leadworks are fascinating and the view over Bunton Hush at Gunnerside awe inspiring, but then heading down Gunnerside back to the Swale. I found the path over Melbecks Moor really dull. Just my opinion. I'd also recommend a path just before Richmond that heads down to the river which means you avoid road, and enter Richmond under the castle along the river.

You want to be booking accommodation pdq. The crunch points will be Keld and Grasmere probably - and so you might want to start with them.

Hope this is useful.


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#44414 - 06/01/09 10:44 PM Re: Planning [Re: Bliss 60]
Filopastry Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/01/09
Posts: 17
Thanks for a v. useful reply. Greatfully recieved.

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#44415 - 07/01/09 09:32 AM Re: Planning [Re: Filopastry]
Oldun Offline
Full Member

Registered: 01/12/04
Posts: 1750
Loc: Renens, Vaud, Switzerland
I agree with getting a company like Sherpa to carry your excess baggage for you. My first LDW was the Hadrians Wall Walk on my own, carrying everything that I thought I would need, plus things that I thought I might need, but very little of the things I actually needed. After 3 very long days the arches of my feet gave out and on the 4th day I collapsed owing to dehydration. My clothes and skin were caked in white salt, and I needed treatment to replace all the minerals I had lost. Since that time I got to know my physical limitations for an LDW well in advance and have always found a company to carry everything except my day pack. I now enjoy all my LDW's no matter what country I am in.

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#44417 - 07/01/09 12:00 PM Re: Planning [Re: Oldun]
Filopastry Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/01/09
Posts: 17
Sorry to be ignorant but what do you carry that makes your bag so heavy that you need someone to pick it up? Reading another thread, people were talking about only taking one change of underwear or in one case disposable underware, to help make their bags lighter.

I can only think I'll be carrying

underwear
about 3-4 t-shirts
2 tops
a jacket/hat (which I'll probably wear all the time)
a change of trousers
water
food
A map(s) (Which I've still not decided on)

I have obviously seriously underestimated what I'll need. What do others carry?

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#44418 - 07/01/09 12:31 PM Re: Planning [Re: Filopastry]
tim smith Offline
Full Member

Registered: 28/10/06
Posts: 1054
Loc: england
i have used disposable under pants actually they were incontinent paper pants with out the padding and they were warmer than ordinary pants, i have a plastic box about a foot square and maybe 4 or5inches deep that i keep a change of trousers and shirt for evening wear, that is when backpacking.
it mostly a memory now.
_________________________
ern

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#44420 - 07/01/09 01:52 PM Re: Planning [Re: tim smith]
Tortoise Offline
Full Member

Registered: 19/08/08
Posts: 133
Loc: South Bucks
Filo,

When I did it last September, I carried my own sack, and it included some of my wife's gear as well - it ended up at around 15kg overall - but I wouldn't recommend that necessarily if you're not used to it.

As long as you're not camping, you can get away with going quite lightweight really. It's often quite feasible to give a few things a quick rinse and dry them out overnight.

Looking at my kit list, a few other odds and ends you might consider...

Waterproof trousers
Gaiters
Lightweight shoes (for evenings)
Compass
Map case
Guidebook
Toothpaste
Tooth Brush
Shaver
Sun cream
Book
Binoculars
Camera
Mobile
Chargers?
Loo paper
Penknife
Torch

and of course, 2 pebbles from St Bees!

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#44421 - 07/01/09 02:00 PM Re: Planning [Re: Tortoise]
Filopastry Offline
Full Member

Registered: 05/01/09
Posts: 17
Yep, I suppose it all adds up; a first aid kit also!

For the purpose of keeping all my information in this thread, can I ask about maps?

I was reading earlier the thread about maps and which are best to use; most seemed to agree the best ones are those out of print.

Can anyone tell me if Henry Stedman's Coast to Coast path 3rd Ed offers walkers decent maps? Does it offer maps for multiple stop points (for eg I intend on staying in Orton instead of Shap)?

It's here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Coast-Path-Briti...6546&sr=1-5

Thanks

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#44422 - 07/01/09 02:32 PM Re: Planning [Re: Filopastry]
Tortoise Offline
Full Member

Registered: 19/08/08
Posts: 133
Loc: South Bucks
We used the Stedman guide. In most respects, it's excellent and worth buying asap as it has lots of info on planning as well as the actual maps - accommodation, distances, eating places, etc, etc.

The maps are hand drawn with lots of writing actually on the maps themselves, the theory being that you don't need to keep referring to the text, just the maps. It's all there, but because it's in black and white, it relies on lots of symbols to indicate the type of path, etc - so not actually as easy to read as proper coloured maps.

As long as you've got reasonable eyesight(!), it's good though. And yes, it does cover all the main off route alternatives like Orton.

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#44423 - 07/01/09 02:52 PM Re: Planning [Re: Tortoise]
Harland Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 29/04/05
Posts: 1328
Loc: North Yorkshire
Originally Posted By: Tortoise
We used the Stedman guide. In most respects, it's excellent and worth buying asap as it has lots of info on planning as well as the actual maps - accommodation, distances, eating places, etc, etc.

The maps are hand drawn with lots of writing actually on the maps themselves, the theory being that you don't need to keep referring to the text, just the maps. It's all there, but because it's in black and white, it relies on lots of symbols to indicate the type of path, etc - so not actually as easy to read as proper coloured maps.

As long as you've got reasonable eyesight(!), it's good though. And yes, it does cover all the main off route alternatives like Orton.


My eyesight isn't too bad but I coloured the maps in, blue for streams, green for trees etc which enabled me to follow it without having to put on my specs, however, when necessary the magnifier at the end of my compass helped out. I like the Steadman book although only if you follow the Wainwright route. Of course if you get "off route" (sometimes referred to as being lost) then not much help. A map is required and this will also help with knowing what you are looking at in the distance.
_________________________
Pennine Way 2005&2014; C2C 2006; SWCP 2007; WHW 2008; GGW 2008; Dales Way 2011; Clev.W 2012; Yorkshire W.W. 2012; Offa's Dyke 2013; Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path 2014; Pembrokeshire Coast Path 2015: LEJoG in stages 2018: Camino 5/2019.

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#44424 - 07/01/09 03:33 PM Re: Planning [Re: Harland]
Mark Bradshaw Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/10/08
Posts: 238
In regards food,if you have a good breakfast,you might find you won't need to carry so much food. I am a big eater,but breakfast tended to carry me over until the evening meal. You might want to take such things as dried banana,or boiled sweets to build up sugar,lost through effort. Water is a must of course........!
Nimrod

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