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#47291 - 28/05/09 11:03 PM C2C completed, a few words
Gregg Offline
Full Member

Registered: 18/01/05
Posts: 369
Loc: Cotati, CA, USA
I completed the c2c on 18 May, started on 6 May. Almost missed my first night in St Bees because of a train delay on the way to Carlisle, barely made the last St Bees train of the day by 10 min.

Day 1 from the Irish Sea to Ennerdale Bridge was sloshy and rainy. A van supported group of eight were behind me. I could hardly see through the fog over Dent Hill, but in the end, Speckled Hen ale at the Shepherds Arms brightened my outlook.

I've started my foot care regimen, two plasters on each foot (toes) on possible problem hot spots along with double socks. Medically, I'm taking three ibupropen per day, doubling up at night later in the walk.

Day 2, I enter the Lake District, ferocious winds keep me from attempting the high route over Haystacks. After tea at Black Sail hut, I found a camera on Loft Beck and soon found its owner, made a friend for life. I had a marvelous dinner at the Langstrath Hotel with Peter and friends.

Overnight, wind and rain pounded my b&b in Stonethwaite but was calmer by morning. Two walkers said they were blown over twice on Haystacks. Glad I didn't try it. Climbing up Greenup Edge and descending Far Easedale, water was rushing at me from all sides, fast streams flowing over the path and slogging the slopes, intermittent rain and sleet. Again, I didn't take the higher ridge route because of the winds. I felt like such a wuss.

Day 4, even fiercer winds dissuaded me from traversing Striding Edge, a big disappointment. Had to keep my walking poles braced in front of me to keep from being blown all the way to Patterdale as sleet beats down on my hood tac,tac,tac,tac.At 1:30 pm, I'm in the White Lion with a Cumberland Ale writing in my journal. At the b&b, a lady told my her companion was blown off the slope at Far Easdale, broke his ankle, tore a ligament, was rescued by helicopter and taken to Whitehaven Hospital. One of the rescuers was also blown off, broke her ankle and had to be airlifted out.

Day 5, weather is calmer, beautiful sky with white cumulus. At Kidsty Pike, I leave fellow walkers and head north on High Street, a glorious ridge walk with full views of the Lake District. I arrive at Brookfield House in Shap at 5:20 to platters of fresh, hot scones. What a great b&b and host. At the Greyhound for dinner with Mike, I find that walkers are dropping like flies.

Day 6 is my longest, 21 miles to Kirby Stephens, but not hard. Many of my fellow walkers are stopping in Orton for a short day. I arrive at 4:30 at Old Croft House greeted like an old friend (I was here 5 yrs ago) with tea and hot buttered scones. Yummm! Three pubs in KS, one has food but no decent real ale, another has a good selection of real ales but no food, third has food and Black Sheep. Yes!

Day 7 is Nine Standards day, clear but very windy again, uncharacteristically blowing out of the east so we are fighting it. After the long hard slog to the top with Bill and Katie, the wind was so powerful all we wanted to do was take each others photos and get out of there. It was boggy climbing up, but now the real bogs begin, huge slices of mud across the path banks of black goo, the earth oozing with black liquid. Bog trotting is an art, but sometimes creativity fails you and the boots suffer. Luckily there is plenty of water to slosh off the black stuff.

At Keld, I continue down the Swale to Muker and Swale Farm b&b, a first class place in the heart of Swaledale. At the Farmers Arms, I find Old Peculier on tap but its hard to choose because they have a great lineup of real ales.

Day 8, I'm driven back up to Keld to take the high route to Reeth. The mining ruins are more interesting than I expected so I spend time exploring. A lady slipped and fell crossing Gunnerside Gill, spraining her ankle. It will be swollen, black and blue and painful the rest of the walk (she persevered).
I reach Reeth by 2 pm and spend quiet time outside the Kings Arms with a pint of Old Peculier, my journal and a local walker.

I split the next two days walk to Ingleby Cross at Bolton, stopping at Richmond for the basics, a bank, bakery, trekking shop and a bookstore. These two days are easy walking but rainy. Dinner in Bolton was at the b&b. At Ingleby Cross, several groups of us met and ate at the Blue Bell Inn. The standout was Magnet Ale from John Smith, top of the line and hard to find.

Day 11, on the way to Clay Bank Top, I enter areas of jet and ironstone mining explained to me by Tim, a local amateur historian out walking with his dog Sable. At Lordstone's Cafe, I see most of today's walkers, Henry and Jane, Bill and Katie, four Australians and the van-supported group. At Great Broughton I eat at the Jet Miners Inn with Henry and Jane and the four Australians. They will all be stopping at the Lion Inn tomorrow while I go on to Glaisdale.

Note: Do not attempt to walk the road into Great Broughton - call your b&b for pickup. The road walk makes a terrible ending to a beautiful day's walk.

Day 12, a morning ride back up to Clay Bank Top. Its a steep climb up onto the bleak but stunning Yorkshire moors, then the Rosedale railway bed leading to the Lion Inn. Across the ridges to Glaisdale, I land at Beggars Bridge b&b, a superb place, at 3:30 (19 miles in 7 hrs). It is also near Arncliffe Arms where I meet Bill and Katie for dinner. I have a goat cheese and red pepper tart w/salad and an organic ale from North Yorkshire Brewery.
This tasty ale makes up for being out of Black Sheep last time I was here.

Day 13 ,y last c2c day, a step across the road and I'm on the path to Robin Hoods Bay and the North Sea. In Grosmont, the rain starts and I put on my Ducks Back, off and on rain the rest of the day. Also off and on are the bogs, some as delicious as the bogs of nine standards fame. I have previously taken the coastal path to RHB, so this time I took the faster cycle track on the disused RR bed. I was rainy wet and tired and ready to dip my boot. As I entered RHB, I saw Bill and Katie coming in on the coast path. It was 5 pm and I hadn't seen them all day. We took photos, threw pebbles, dipped boots and had drinks and dinner together at the Bay Hotel, a grand celebration.

Next day, I walked the coast path to Scarborough to catch the train to York. It rained again, but the coast was beautiful. I met a walking group of 12 pensioners and, after questioning, told them I had just finished the C2C yesterday in 13 days and I was 71 yrs old. They gave me a round of applause with cheers. I left with a big grin.

I amazingly finished with no blisters, my new Lowa boots were remarkably comfortable. Of course, I had the usual aches, sore muscles and sore feet.
All bones are still intact and I have a barrel of wonderful memories.

Top
#47292 - 28/05/09 11:22 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: Gregg]
m/ark Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/05/09
Posts: 559
Loc: Cirencester.
Well done Gregg, although YOU missed the sun by two weeks.

Top
#47293 - 28/05/09 11:32 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: Gregg]
tim smith Offline
Full Member

Registered: 28/10/06
Posts: 1054
Loc: england
Well Done Gregg,
especially in those conditions.
and you were right not to take chances on the high routes,
Sriding Edge does get easier each time one does it. the first time is a bit frightening, but i would not attempt it in windy conditions, i hope you enjoy your memories for many years to come.
_________________________
ern

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#47294 - 29/05/09 12:14 AM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: tim smith]
Dr.BongoBingo Offline
Full Member

Registered: 10/10/08
Posts: 46

Congratulations Gregg....and thanks for the brief synopsis.

Are you considering a "blog" ?

Bing

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#47296 - 29/05/09 01:00 AM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: Dr.BongoBingo]
bogstomper Offline
Full Member

Registered: 26/12/08
Posts: 34
Well done Gregg, I completed the C2C last Year and I have to say that the best B & B en route was Swale Farm at Muker, I hope you agree ! It had everything and the beer at The Farmers Arms takes some beating.

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#47305 - 29/05/09 01:37 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: bogstomper]
boggleholed Offline
Full Member

Registered: 26/03/09
Posts: 100
Arise sir gregg.

We the citizens of northern england salute you.

71 years ; 13 days.

I hearby team you with my 10 year old son, emperor roscoe, who did march that very same route in recent weeks in 12 days.

Rspkt.

BH

PS i read that you did then march on to Scarborough Castle ; are you by chance related to that other famous American Forrest Gump?

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#47307 - 29/05/09 01:51 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: boggleholed]
Janice & Rottie Offline
Full Member

Registered: 30/06/05
Posts: 516
Loc: Coniston, Cumbria, UK
Well done Gregg. Brings back memories.
_________________________
Janice & Harlie(dog)

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#47309 - 29/05/09 03:10 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: Gregg]
Mark Bradshaw Offline
Full Member

Registered: 06/10/08
Posts: 238
Originally Posted By: Gregg
I completed the c2c on 18 May, started on 6 May. Almost missed my first night in St Bees because of a train delay on the way to Carlisle, barely made the last St Bees train of the day by 10 min.

Day 1 from the Irish Sea to Ennerdale Bridge was sloshy and rainy. A van supported group of eight were behind me. I could hardly see through the fog over Dent Hill, but in the end, Speckled Hen ale at the Shepherds Arms brightened my outlook.

I've started my foot care regimen, two plasters on each foot (toes) on possible problem hot spots along with double socks. Medically, I'm taking three ibupropen per day, doubling up at night later in the walk.

Day 2, I enter the Lake District, ferocious winds keep me from attempting the high route over Haystacks. After tea at Black Sail hut, I found a camera on Loft Beck and soon found its owner, made a friend for life. I had a marvelous dinner at the Langstrath Hotel with Peter and friends.

Overnight, wind and rain pounded my b&b in Stonethwaite but was calmer by morning. Two walkers said they were blown over twice on Haystacks. Glad I didn't try it. Climbing up Greenup Edge and descending Far Easedale, water was rushing at me from all sides, fast streams flowing over the path and slogging the slopes, intermittent rain and sleet. Again, I didn't take the higher ridge route because of the winds. I felt like such a wuss.

Day 4, even fiercer winds dissuaded me from traversing Striding Edge, a big disappointment. Had to keep my walking poles braced in front of me to keep from being blown all the way to Patterdale as sleet beats down on my hood tac,tac,tac,tac.At 1:30 pm, I'm in the White Lion with a Cumberland Ale writing in my journal. At the b&b, a lady told my her companion was blown off the slope at Far Easdale, broke his ankle, tore a ligament, was rescued by helicopter and taken to Whitehaven Hospital. One of the rescuers was also blown off, broke her ankle and had to be airlifted out.

Day 5, weather is calmer, beautiful sky with white cumulus. At Kidsty Pike, I leave fellow walkers and head north on High Street, a glorious ridge walk with full views of the Lake District. I arrive at Brookfield House in Shap at 5:20 to platters of fresh, hot scones. What a great b&b and host. At the Greyhound for dinner with Mike, I find that walkers are dropping like flies.

Day 6 is my longest, 21 miles to Kirby Stephens, but not hard. Many of my fellow walkers are stopping in Orton for a short day. I arrive at 4:30 at Old Croft House greeted like an old friend (I was here 5 yrs ago) with tea and hot buttered scones. Yummm! Three pubs in KS, one has food but no decent real ale, another has a good selection of real ales but no food, third has food and Black Sheep. Yes!

Day 7 is Nine Standards day, clear but very windy again, uncharacteristically blowing out of the east so we are fighting it. After the long hard slog to the top with Bill and Katie, the wind was so powerful all we wanted to do was take each others photos and get out of there. It was boggy climbing up, but now the real bogs begin, huge slices of mud across the path banks of black goo, the earth oozing with black liquid. Bog trotting is an art, but sometimes creativity fails you and the boots suffer. Luckily there is plenty of water to slosh off the black stuff.

At Keld, I continue down the Swale to Muker and Swale Farm b&b, a first class place in the heart of Swaledale. At the Farmers Arms, I find Old Peculier on tap but its hard to choose because they have a great lineup of real ales.

Day 8, I'm driven back up to Keld to take the high route to Reeth. The mining ruins are more interesting than I expected so I spend time exploring. A lady slipped and fell crossing Gunnerside Gill, spraining her ankle. It will be swollen, black and blue and painful the rest of the walk (she persevered).
I reach Reeth by 2 pm and spend quiet time outside the Kings Arms with a pint of Old Peculier, my journal and a local walker.

I split the next two days walk to Ingleby Cross at Bolton, stopping at Richmond for the basics, a bank, bakery, trekking shop and a bookstore. These two days are easy walking but rainy. Dinner in Bolton was at the b&b. At Ingleby Cross, several groups of us met and ate at the Blue Bell Inn. The standout was Magnet Ale from John Smith, top of the line and hard to find.

Day 11, on the way to Clay Bank Top, I enter areas of jet and ironstone mining explained to me by Tim, a local amateur historian out walking with his dog Sable. At Lordstone's Cafe, I see most of today's walkers, Henry and Jane, Bill and Katie, four Australians and the van-supported group. At Great Broughton I eat at the Jet Miners Inn with Henry and Jane and the four Australians. They will all be stopping at the Lion Inn tomorrow while I go on to Glaisdale.

Note: Do not attempt to walk the road into Great Broughton - call your b&b for pickup. The road walk makes a terrible ending to a beautiful day's walk.

Day 12, a morning ride back up to Clay Bank Top. Its a steep climb up onto the bleak but stunning Yorkshire moors, then the Rosedale railway bed leading to the Lion Inn. Across the ridges to Glaisdale, I land at Beggars Bridge b&b, a superb place, at 3:30 (19 miles in 7 hrs). It is also near Arncliffe Arms where I meet Bill and Katie for dinner. I have a goat cheese and red pepper tart w/salad and an organic ale from North Yorkshire Brewery.
This tasty ale makes up for being out of Black Sheep last time I was here.

Day 13 ,y last c2c day, a step across the road and I'm on the path to Robin Hoods Bay and the North Sea. In Grosmont, the rain starts and I put on my Ducks Back, off and on rain the rest of the day. Also off and on are the bogs, some as delicious as the bogs of nine standards fame. I have previously taken the coastal path to RHB, so this time I took the faster cycle track on the disused RR bed. I was rainy wet and tired and ready to dip my boot. As I entered RHB, I saw Bill and Katie coming in on the coast path. It was 5 pm and I hadn't seen them all day. We took photos, threw pebbles, dipped boots and had drinks and dinner together at the Bay Hotel, a grand celebration.

Next day, I walked the coast path to Scarborough to catch the train to York. It rained again, but the coast was beautiful. I met a walking group of 12 pensioners and, after questioning, told them I had just finished the C2C yesterday in 13 days and I was 71 yrs old. They gave me a round of applause with cheers. I left with a big grin.

I amazingly finished with no blisters, my new Lowa boots were remarkably comfortable. Of course, I had the usual aches, sore muscles and sore feet.
All bones are still intact and I have a barrel of wonderful memories.






Well done,Gregg - and for doing it 71 years young.
Nimrod

Top
#47334 - 30/05/09 12:51 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words [Re: Mark Bradshaw]
lightweightmick Offline
Full Member

Registered: 18/11/04
Posts: 1697
Loc: North Derbyshire UK
Yes, well done Gregg! Sounds a most memorable trip. Great!
_________________________
St Bees or Bust!
A Walk in the Park...s

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#47335 - 30/05/09 03:14 PM Re: C2C completed, a few words---and Old Peculier [Re: Gregg]
joe yak Offline
Full Member

Registered: 22/02/09
Posts: 160
Loc: berkeley, ca, usa
Thank you for the excellent account of your very blustery walk across the UK, for making it "intact", and for your report on the watering holes of choice. I'll be on trail the latter half of SEP, but I hope to escape the challenging weather you engaged. Looking to do it in 12-days, or whatever it takes, but I'm a few days younger and I'll be doing it with a few good friends.

It's good to hear fine accounts of the virtues and practicality of using walking poles/sticks. I do think you should have tried the lighter liner socks instead of doubling up on he heavy socks. If your Lowa's were Gortex lined, it might have been perfect. I don't have problem feet---"knock on wood".

Anyway, congratulations for your excellence.

Cheers, blue skies and up you go!

joe
_________________________
"Beneath his pessimism, his bleak conviction that all the machinery was rigged against him, at the bottom of his soul was a faith that he was going to outwit it by carefully watching the signs he was going to know when to dodge and be spared." -H.Thompson

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