Baggage Moving Service Accommodation booking service Sherpa Van Home Choose which trail you want to follow Sherpa Van Home Sherpa Van Shop Sherpa Van Message Board Contact us About the Sherpa Van Project
Advertising

Coast to Coast and other paths booking now!

Daily Dales Way Passenger Service

Baggage and Accommodation Booking Services for Walking Holidays in Britain - Now Booking!

Top Posters
Slogger 2631
Lounge Lizard 2013
slowcoach 1925
Oldun 1750
lightweightmick 1462
Find Us On Facebook
Meet other Sherpa Van Forum members on Facebook
Meet other Sherpa Van Forum members on Facebook
Forum Stats
8252 Members
17 Forums
3340 Topics
34937 Posts

Max Online: 234 @ 03/05/12 11:34 AM
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#61058 - 26/04/11 10:24 PM Boots or shoes?
loradora Offline
Full Member

Registered: 18/04/11
Posts: 8
Hello again forum! So, I've less than two weeks to go before I set off on the C2C. I'm thinking of taking boots and shoes - I have weak ankles, so I need my boots for rough terrain. Aside from the lakes, wet weather days and the boggy bit after the nine standards, do you guys reckon I can wear my merrell walking shoes the rest of the time?

Top
#61059 - 26/04/11 10:34 PM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: loradora]
slowcoach Offline
Full Member

Registered: 30/07/09
Posts: 1925
Loc: Yorkshire
At the moment, after the recent very dry weather, you can get away with shoes for a large section of the walk. But, ask yourself this .... how do you know when you set off in the morning what the underfoot conditions will be along your route?

From Keld onwards you can currently expect dry underfoot conditions ALMOST to the Bay .... but will this be so in two weeks time? Will the shoes support you along the railway. My Rohan walking shoes will, but I wear boots in case of sudden heavy rain and uneven ground (and they are incredibly comfy). Why take any risks? 190 miles is a long way!

Top
#61061 - 27/04/11 07:20 AM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: slowcoach]
HB Offline
Full Member

Registered: 11/09/07
Posts: 224
Loc: Norfolk, UK
Hi loradora, walking shoes are fine but not something I would wear on the coast to coast for a couple of reasons.

As the weather has been dry the ground will be hard and any ruts/cracks on the ground may cause you to twist your ankle or indeed trip over.

The second reason is if you injure yourself on this walk it can be over in seconds and all the planning and excitement of such a lovely walk and achievement will come to an end. If you are walking with someone else you will also have let them down.

On one of my crossings we had a member of the group who wanted to wear walking sandles and couldn't see how it would affect the rest of the group if she had an injury. Of course anyone can get an injury, but if one takes all precautions against such things then it would be an accident not negligence.

Wear those boots, be safe and have a lovely crossing, let us know how it goes. Best of luck.

Failing to prepare and you prepare to fail!!

Top
#61072 - 27/04/11 11:53 AM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: HB]
HackPacker Offline
Full Member

Registered: 26/06/09
Posts: 134
Take both if you have the option, without a shadow of doubt. Boots are preferable for the Lakes section, when the rubble underfoot makes ankle support invaluable. But the later sections are much easier - and drier -underfoot and I much prefer walking in my North face Hedgehog walking trainers. But as SC suggests, conditions can change almost instantaneously, so there's no guarantee you won't need your boots later on if the weather isn't great.

Top
#61074 - 27/04/11 12:22 PM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: HackPacker]
walkanddrink Offline
Full Member

Registered: 19/06/10
Posts: 119
Loc: Blackpool
Shoes would definately help on some of the tarmac sections but hills & bogs I'd go for the boots

Mick

Top
#61075 - 27/04/11 12:40 PM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: HackPacker]
MarkF Offline
Full Member

Registered: 31/01/06
Posts: 233
Loc: Canberra, ACT, Australia
"A pound on the foot is equivalent to five pounds on the back".

Please treat my remarks with a degree of caution given your comment about having weak ankles. The reason for this is that you may not have time to prepare for the transition from boots to trail shoes.

I largely disagree with the boots arguments and would endorse the use of good trail shoes on the C2C. By good trail shoes I mean ones with a decent foot plate under the ball of the foot which protects the feet from rocks and protrusions on the track. I would only suggest boots if you are carrying heavy loads or are tackling seriously difficult terrain.

As for ankle support I found that I had far more ankle problems (as well as blisters) when wearing boots rather than trail shoes. Allow nature to work as it was intended and strengthen your ankles by walking regularly in trail shoes. This experience has been gained not only from my own experiences but also from the people I have walked with over the past 45 years. Thinking back over the knees and ankles I have bandaged in that time, 90% would have been boot wearers although most of my companions wore trail shoes or sandshoes (plimsols).

The route cannot be reasonably defined as seriously rough under foot apart from perhaps the 9 Standards section which is much more boggy than rough. Lighter feet translate to greater mobility and fewer descents into the bogs.

While I don't have a great deal of experience of UK walking, I have done the C2C in relatively wet conditions and I do have considerable walking experience in other parts of the world including South West Tasmania with far rougher conditions and equivalent rainfall (3+ metres per year).

If you think my views are at the lunatic fringe then I suggest you do some reading in the international lightweight walking forums where my views would be considered by some conservative.
_________________________
Mark
___________________
Walking my own walk

Top
#61078 - 27/04/11 01:25 PM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: MarkF]
geofconnor Online   content
Full Member

Registered: 01/08/05
Posts: 76
Loc: Katonah, NY, USA
While there is a small but vocal lightweight walking fraternity, exemplified by the "two sisters" who walked the 2000 mile Appalachian Trail barefoot - only putting on trail shoes when the got hit by a blizzard in the Smokies (a great read by the way), unless you have trained on similar terrain and similar distance in shoes I would not advise it, especially with weak ankles. Think of the tree root section through the woods at the end of Ennerdale Water - that would be nasty without good support.

The only sections I would consider in trail shoes would be the 20 miles after Richmond and both headland walks, although if it is a hot day the road section would transmit heat through shoes more readily than boots.

Top
#61190 - 03/05/11 09:26 AM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: loradora]
rjb1978 Offline
Full Member

Registered: 14/03/09
Posts: 84
Just finished the c2c on Sunday. I did about 60% in boots and 40% in trainers. Trainers were great on some sections, only really needed boots on the real rocky boots. Not sure about trail shoes - do they have such a spongy soft sole like trainers do? If not then they're not for me, might as well get boots.

Top
#61206 - 03/05/11 02:08 PM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: rjb1978]
MarkF Offline
Full Member

Registered: 31/01/06
Posts: 233
Loc: Canberra, ACT, Australia
Trail shoes (trail runners) are much better protected under foot and have more aggressive sole patterns than normal runners. One brand which gets very good word or mouth is Innov-8 but like boots, fit is everything.

To me the benefits are far less time needed to break them in, less weight on the feet and cooler, better ventilated feet which I find reduces the likelihood of blisters and foot damage. I started walking in Dunlop sand shoes (plimsols), converted to boots for about 20 years and have now returned to trail shoes now the technology behind them has improved so much. I do acknowledge that boots have a place in very cold and extremely rugged terrain - not what is found on the C2C or even on walking trails in the Alps in summer.

The comments about heat coming through the soles being a problem for trail shoes compared to boots is ridiculous. Come and walk in Australia where temperatures can exceed 35-40 degrees on a regular basis and you will find the majority of people wearing light breathable footwear, not boots and multiple pairs of socks.

I am also yet to be convinced that boots provide better "ankle protection". If you mean protecting the ankle from rocks then the extra padding of a boot does that, but most mid height boots do nothing to protect from sprained ankles etc in my experience of 45+ years of walking. This includes hearing innumerable stories from customers when I worked in bushwalking shops fitting boots and shoes.
_________________________
Mark
___________________
Walking my own walk

Top
#61209 - 03/05/11 05:36 PM Re: Boots or shoes? [Re: MarkF]
slowcoach Offline
Full Member

Registered: 30/07/09
Posts: 1925
Loc: Yorkshire
Boots should suit the purpose to what the user intends to use them for. A basic but often forgotten point.

Anything other than good supportive boots are pretty useless for long distance fell and bog work. If you find yourself off route, as you might in mist, then crossing tussocks of heather and sieves can easily lead to strained, sprained or broken ankles. There are large sections of the C to C where other footwear is perfectly adequate ... the railway and the roads as a prime examples. On the other hand, Nine Standards can be a *** after heavy rain (unless you take the road option).

Breaking in quality boots is now pretty much out of fashion. I would certainly use them on trial walks to test them for comfort and suitability, but its years since I bought boots which required breaking in in the old sense of the word ... Hawkins Scafell, so that dates me.

Using a carrier a walker can have the luxury of taking two pairs, but, without this I firmly believe in the "worst case scenario" and this is crossing the bogs on Nine Standards after two days of rain!

Top
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 >


Moderator:  justin, noj 

Home  Baggage Service   Accommodation Booking  Trail Planning   Useful Links   Book Store   About Us

E-Mail: info@sherpavan.com


Copyright The Sherpa Van Project, 29 The Green, Richmond, North Yorkshire DL10 4RG. Tel 0871 5200124 Fax (44) 01748 825561